Archive for January 2015

Break-In Oil Change for Corvette Included in Chevrolet Complete Care Program

2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06

Fig 1

 

A new mileage interval has been established for the first engine oil change on 2014-2015 Corvette Stingray models with the Z51 Performance Package and Z06 models. These vehicles are equipped with an engine featuring a dry sump oil system. The first oil change should take place at 500 miles (800 km) on these vehicles.

 

If the vehicle is driven continuously at a high engine speed with the first factory oil fill, silicone sealants in the engine’s gaskets may degrade the anti-foaming properties of the oil. This may lead to oil leaking out from the air cleaner assembly due to the oil foaming condition. The oil foam does not affect the engine’s durability, but changing the oil at 500 miles will help prevent oil foaming in the future because the silicone sealants are removed with the original oil.

 

Shown below (Fig. 2) is the:

A. Dry sump engine oil tank fill cap

B. Engine oil dipstick

C. Engine air cleaner/filter

 

2015 "LT4" 6.2L V-8 AFM VVT DI SC (LT4) for Chevrolet Corvette Z

Fig 2

 

Once the break-in oil change is performed and the Oil Life Monitor is reset, owners should follow the Oil Life Monitoring system for all future oil change needs.

 

TIP: Only use Mobil 1 when performing an oil change on any Corvette under the Chevrolet Complete Care program.

 

An additional oil change has been added to the required maintenance schedule. Up to five oil changes are now covered as part of the Chevrolet Complete Care program, which covers 2 years/24,000 miles (40,000 km in Canada) of select required maintenance.

 

A second printing of the 2015 Owner Manual is being updated with this change.

 

– Thanks to Jeff Strausser

Quick Reference Guide for GDS2 Diagnostics

A single-page, quick reference guide has been released to help technicians quickly determine when to use the Tech2 diagnostic scan tool (for older GM vehicles) and when to use the Global Diagnostic System 2 (GDS2) — the latest PC-based diagnostic software — and an MDI/VCI tool.

 

Click below (Fig. 3) to view the quick reference guide. It’s also available at https://service.gm.com/userguides/GDS2_Supported_Vehicles.pdf.

 

F03 gds2 chart

Fig 3

 

Technicians should feel free to bookmark this link or print the guide and keep it as a quick reference.

 

The transition of diagnostic scan tools from the Tech2 to GDS2 requires technicians to understand which technology and device to connect to each GM vehicle. This may be especially tricky during the transition model years between 2010 and 2013 when some vehicles required the Tech2 scan tool and others required GDS2 and an MDI/VCI tool.

 

GM North American Tech2 software updates concluded in the 2013 model year. For 2014, all North American vehicles are supported with GDS2.

 

If a technician uses the wrong tool on a vehicle, it could result in a “no communication” error message, an inaccurate reading, or the device may not return any useful data. The GDS2 guide can help save repair time by knowing in advance which software and device to use.

 

– Thanks to Chris Henley, Kevin Fondaw

Cover Windshield during Front Fender Removal

When removing, replacing or adjusting a front fender on a 2015 Colorado or Canyon, a protective covering should be placed over the windshield at the top rear bolt (Fig. 4) to prevent windshield breakage. The cover will protect the windshield when loosening the bolt. (Fig. 5)

 

F04 fender top bolt R

Fig 4

 

F05 fender windshield

Fig 5

 

Since access to the top rear bolt is limited, use a ball end TORX driver to loosen the bolt. The fender is slotted so the bolt does not have to be removed in order to remove the fender. (Fig. 6)

F06 fender

Fig 6

 

– Thanks to Charles Hensley

Transport Recommendations for ATS, CTS

Underbody components on 2013-2015 ATS and 2014-2015 CTS models may be damaged if the vehicle is not secured properly during recovery and transport.

 

When recovering or transporting an ATS or CTS, do not hook, pull or secure the vehicle using any of the underbody or suspension components. (Fig. 7) Any damage to these components would not be covered by the vehicle warranty. Be sure to pass this information to the person towing the vehicle to prevent any damage.

 

F07 underbody points 7

Fig 7

 

The ATS and CTS should only be transported on a flatbed car carrier and secured to the bed using a nylon strap harness over all four tires. (Fig. 8)

 F08 wheel harness

Fig 8

 

If it’s necessary to use the flatbed-mounted winch to recover the vehicle, install the recovery tow eye, located in the rear compartment storage area, in the front or rear fascia socket. (Fig. 9) Attach the recovery cable to the tow eye to load the vehicle.

F09 tow eye

 Fig 9

– Thanks to Mark Gordon and Jean Hart

Radio Antenna Amplifier in Vehicle Bag

On some 2015 Impalas, a radio antenna amplifier may be found in the vehicle bag, located in the trunk, during the Pre-Delivery Inspection (PDI).

 

The Radio Antenna Module was correctly installed. No repairs are needed. The radio antenna amplifier was mistakenly added to the vehicle bag in the trunk. Discard the amplifier.

 

– Thanks to Christopher Hightower

 

Brake Pad Wear Sensor Harness

A Change Brake Pads message may be displayed on the Driver Information Center (DIC) of some 2014-2015 Camaro Z/28 and 2015 Corvette Stingray Z06 models. There will not be any DTCs set.

 

These models feature front and rear disc brake pads with integral, electronic brake pad wear sensors. When the disc brake pad wear reaches the minimum allowable thickness, the wear sensor contacts the disc brake rotor and illuminates a message on the DIC.

 

If the message is displayed, check the brake pads to see if they are worn, but if they are not, closely inspect the brake pad wear sensor harnesses for any damage. In some cases, the sensor harness may be coming in contact with a tire, causing the wiring/terminals to be pulled out of the plastic connector. (Fig. 10) As a result, this condition causes the message to be displayed on the DIC.

F10 4054951

 Fig 10

If any damage is found to the brake pad wear sensor wiring, the harness should be replaced. If the terminals are pulled from the connector, either secure the terminals back into the connector or, if repairs are not possible due to the extent of the damage, replace the terminals as required.

 

To prevent any damage to the sensor wiring in the future, secure the sensor harness to the brake hose with a zip tie.

 

– Thanks to Matt Bierlein

Transfer Case Selector Switch

A Service 4WD message may be displayed in the instrument panel cluster on some 2015 Colorado and Canyon models equipped with 4-wheel-drive (RPO NQ6, NQ7). DTCs B2725 (Transfer Case Range Selection Switch Circuit) or B0770 (AWD Indicator Circuit) may be set in the Transfer Case Control Module (TCCM).

 

Some vehicles may have been built with the incorrect Transfer Case Selector Switch on the left side of the instrument panel, causing the Service 4WD message and DTCs to set.

 

Colorado 4WD

 

On 2015 Colorado models with 4-wheel drive (RPO NQ7), the vehicle is not available with the Auto 4WD option. The Transfer Case Selector Switch should not have an Auto 4WD position. (Fig. 11)

 

If the vehicle has a Transfer Case Selector Switch with the Auto position, DTC B2725 sets when Auto 4WD is selected, sending an invalid voltage to the TCCM.

 

F11 4051411

Fig 11

 

Replace the Transfer Case Selector Switch with the correct switch listed in the parts catalog. If the vehicle has the correct switch and the DTC is set, continue with the appropriate Service Information diagnostics.

 

Canyon Auto 4WD

 

2015 Canyon models equipped with automatic 4-wheel-drive (RPO NQ6) have a Transfer Case Selector Switch with the Auto position. (Fig. 12) A switch without the Auto position may set DTC B0770, which is for the Auto 4WD LED indicator circuit. It will not set DTC B2725.

 

F12 4051409

Fig 12

 

Replace the Transfer Case Selector Switch with the correct switch listed in the parts catalog. If the vehicle has the correct switch and the DTC is set, continue with the appropriate Service Information diagnostics.

 

To replace the switch, remove the instrument panel knee bolster and then use an appropriate tool to depress the tabs to remove the switch assembly from the bezel. (Fig. 13)

 

F13 4wd switch replacement

Fig 13

 

– Thanks to Steve Schipansky

Full-Size Truck and SUV Ambient Temperature Display Information

How the ambient temperature reading is sent to the radio display varies on 2015 Escalade models, Tahoe, Silverado, Suburban, Sierra, and Yukon models; and 2014 Silverado 1500 and Sierra 1500, depending on the model and radio option.

 

The following block diagrams may help clarify system operation.

 

1500 Trucks and All SUVs with Radio RPO IO3

 

Ambient Air Temperature Sensor >>> (hard wired circuits 636 and 61) >>> ECM >>> (High Speed LAN) >>> BCM >>> (Low Speed LAN) >>> Radio Tuner >>> (LVDS Cable) >>> Integrated Center Stack Display

 

After the BCM sends the ambient air temperature out on the Low Speed LAN buss, the HVAC Control Module also uses this information for HVAC related requirements.

 

1500 Trucks and All SUVs with Radio RPOs IO4, IO5, IO6

 

Ambient Air Temperature Sensor >>> (hard wired circuits 636 and 61) >>> ECM >>> (High Speed LAN) >>> BCM >>> (Low Speed LAN) >>> Radio Tuner >>> (MOST Buss) >>> HMI >>> (LVDS Cable) >>> Integrated Center Stack Display

 

After the BCM sends the ambient air temperature out on the Low Speed LAN buss, the HVAC Control Module also uses this information for HVAC related requirements.

 

2500/3500 Trucks with Radio RPO IO3

 

Ambient Air Temperature Sensor >>> (hard wired circuits 636 and 61) >>> Instrument Panel Cluster >>> (Low Speed LAN) >>> Radio Tuner >>> (LVDS Cable) >>> Integrated Center Stack Display

 

After the Instrument Panel Cluster sends the ambient air temperature out on the Low Speed LAN buss, the HVAC Control Module also uses this information for HVAC related requirements.

 

2500/3500 Trucks with Radio RPO IO4, IO5, IO6

 

Ambient Air Temperature Sensor >>> (hard wired circuits 636 and 61) >>> Instrument Panel Cluster >>> (Low Speed LAN) >>> Radio Tuner >>> (MOST Buss) >>> HMI >>> (LVDS Cable) >>> Integrated Center Stack Display

 

After the Instrument Panel Cluster sends the ambient air temperature out on the Low Speed LAN buss, the HVAC Control Module also uses this information for HVAC related requirements.

 

TIP: The Ambient Air Temperature Sensor located in the passenger outside mirror on trucks equipped with the 6.6L diesel engine is not used for the ambient temperature display that is located on the radio or for HVAC-related requirements. This sensor is used only for powertrain requirements. The Ambient Air Temperature Sensor used for the radio display and HVAC is located behind the right side of the grill.

 

– Thanks to Jim Will

Service Information Links Added for Quick Access to Maintenance Items and Maintenance Replacement Parts

Convenient links to maintenance items and maintenance replacement parts have been added to the Service Information for the 2012-2016 model years. These links put common maintenance resources all in one easy-to-find location.

 

TIP: The Maintenance Items chart and Maintenance Replacement Parts document can be found after building the desired model and then selecting Service Manual > General Information > Maintenance and Lubrication > Specifications. (Fig. 1) Or users can keyword search for maintenance items or maintenance replacement parts.

 

F01 maintenance links image

Fig 1

 

The new chart (Fig. 2) provides fast navigation to maintenance-related procedures and information, including approximate fluid capacities, resetting the GM Oil Life System, tire pressure indicator sensor learn, passenger compartment air filter replacement, and spark plug replacement. This information is currently located in various sections of the Service Information as well. By linking the information in the new chart, it reduces the amount of navigation required to view the different maintenance procedures and information.

 

F02 maintenance items image

Fig 2

 

In addition, for North American models, the Maintenance Replacement Parts document (Fig. 3) provides part numbers for common maintenance items, similar to what is found in the owner manuals. It lists parts such as the engine air cleaner/filter, engine oil filter, spark plugs and wiper blades.

 

F03 maintenance replacement parts image

Fig 3

 

– Thanks to Mike Adamczyk

Transmission Technical Guide PDFs Now Available

The GM Service Information recently added Transmission Technical Guides for many transmissions. The guides are available on the Service Information home page in a printer-friendly PDF format.

 

From the Service Information home page, select the link for Unit Repair, Specialty Publication or Transmission Technical Guide. (Fig. 4)

 

F04 tech guide link

Fig 4

 

The right side of the page lists the Supplemental Transmission Technical Guides. (Fig. 5)

 

F05 tech guides

Fig 5

 

Since the guides (Fig. 6) are rather large, it may take 30 seconds or so to open.

 

F06 trans guide image

Fig 6

 

– Thanks to Lisa Scott

Download PDI Forms from the Service Information

Pre-Delivery Inspection (PDI) forms can now be downloaded from the Service Information.

 

To access the PDI forms:

1. Select a late model from the drop down menu or enter the full VIN and select “Next.”

2. PDI forms are located at the bottom of the “Select a vehicle publication to view” page (Fig. 7)

 

F07 pdi form link image

Fig 7

 

Once opened, the form (Fig. 8) performs as if it was retrieved from GlobalConnect. The form can be filled out online, but data typed into the form cannot be saved. If there is an additional Special Inspection Items page that applies to the vehicle, it will be included with the PDI form. Both forms can be printed.

 

F08 pdi form image

Fig 8

 

– Thanks to Lisa Scott

 

Unable To Learn Tire Pressure Monitor after Tire Service

After performing a tire service (rotation) on some 2007-2012 Malibu, 2007-2010 G6 and 2008-2009 AURA models, the vehicle may go into tire pressure indicator sensor learn mode but not respond to a sensor or sensors that have been activated with the Tire Pressure Monitor (TPM) tool (either EL-46079 Tire Pressure Monitor Diagnostic Tool or EL-50448 Tire Pressure Monitor Sensor Activation Tool).

 

Remove the B+ fuse for the OnStar Vehicle Communication Interface Module (VCIM). For fuse location, refer to the appropriate Service Information for the vehicle being serviced. If it is now possible to complete the TPM learn, complete the procedure and then reinstall fuse.

 

TIP: If an obvious fault or concern is present with OnStar and the account is active, proceed with normal diagnostics according to the appropriate Service Information.

 

– Thanks to Christopher Crumb

Engine Tick Sound Heard Inside Cab

An engine or High Pressure Fuel Pump tick sound may be heard inside the cab of some 2015-2016 Colorado and Canyon models equipped with the 2.5L 4-cylinder engine, 2.8L diesel engine, or 3.6L V6 engine (RPO LCV, LWN, LFX). Comparisons with other trucks with the same powertrain may show the other trucks to be quieter.

 

TIP: A tick noise of this type is a normal characteristic of direct injection engines. Refer to Bulletin #07-06-04-025 for additional information about direct injection fuel system operation.

 

An acoustic seal (Fig. 9) may have been knocked out of place during assembly. If this acoustic seal is dislodged or missing (Fig. 10), the High Pressure Fuel pump tick sound can easily be heard inside the cab of the truck.

 

F09 seal cu

Fig 9

 F10 4053811

Fig 10

 

If the seal is missing, replace it with one from Kit Part Number 23135690. Reference the Blower Upper Case Replacement section of the appropriate Service Information to assist with seal replacement.

 

– Thanks to Jeremy Richardson

 

Updated September 19, 2016

Inoperative Heated Seats

The driver and front passenger heated seats (RPO KA1) may be inoperative on some 2010-2013 Lacrosse; 2010-2015 Camaro, Equinox, Terrain; 2011-2015 Regal, Cruze, Volt; 2012-2015 Verano, Sonic; and 2013-2015 Malibu models. DTC U0209 (Lost Communication with Front Seat Heating Control Module) may be set in the HVAC module.

 

The inoperative heated seats condition may be due to an intermittent software issue within the heated seat module that results in loss of communication from the HVAC module.

 

TIP: Do not replace the heated seat module for this condition.

 

If both heated seats are inoperative and DTC U0209 is set in the HVAC module, remove the appropriate fuse for the K29 Seat Heating Control Module and reinstall. This will reset the K29 Seat Heating Control Module.

 

Next, reprogram the K29 Seat Heating Control Module using the latest calibration in TIS2Web, available December 8, 2014.

 

If both heated seats are inoperative but DTC U0209 is not present, follow the normal heated seat inoperative diagnostics in the appropriate Service Information.

 

– Thanks to Christopher Crumb

Radio Backlighting Stays On

On some 2014 Silverado 1500 and Sierra 1500 and 2015 Silverado and Sierra models equipped with transfer case RPO NQF or NQH, the radio backlighting may stay on after the ignition has been turned off and the key has been removed for several minutes. Eventually, the battery will go dead.

 

While diagnosing this condition, voltage may be present at the following fuses with the ignition key in the Off position: F23DL, F22DL, F30DL, F31DL, F32DL. These fuses are all on the same Run/Crank Ignition Buss Bar, in the Left I/P Fuse Block, and should not have any power with the ignition off. In some cases, there may only be 2 or 3 volts present. Use a voltmeter to check for voltage.

 

This condition may be caused by the Transfer Case Control Module (TCCM) back feeding voltage into the fuse block with the ignition off. If the TCCM is disconnected, the voltage at the fuses will be gone. If the TCCM is replaced, the issue may only be corrected for a short time. The internal circuitry of the TCCM may have been permanently damaged by a voltage spike, causing the back feed.

 

In most cases, the voltage spike is caused by an aftermarket accessory, which uses a solenoid or relay, that is wired onto the F30DL fuse or to the X61A I/P Junction Block connector X7, terminal 11, or connector X5, terminal 35. If these solenoids or relays are not properly suppressed, they will produce a voltage spike. The voltage spike can be transmitted onto the Run/Crank Ignition Buss Bar and permanently damage the TCCM.

 

TIP: Do not replace the TCCM until the root cause of the condition has been narrowed to the solenoid/relay voltage spikes.

 

To prevent damage to any of the sensitive electronic components on the bussed circuit, the solenoid/relay must have the control circuit suppressed with a diode. (Fig. 11) The diode will prevent the voltage spikes from being transmitted onto the Run/Crank circuit.

 

F11 2150773

Fig 11

 

Install a diode, P/N 12112422, across the coil of the solenoid. Connect the striped end of the diode to the positive terminal of the coil and connect the other end of the diode to ground. Be sure to insulate the diode with heat shrink tubing (Fig. 12) before installation.

 F12 2150775

Fig 12

 

Some solenoids/relays may only have a positive post and will get their ground through the mounting bracket. (Fig. 13) In this case, the striped end of the diode is to be connected to the positive terminal and other end should be connected to the ground of the solenoid/relay.

 

F13 2226201

Fig 13

 

Also install a diode, P/N 12112422, across the coil of the relay. Connect the striped end of the diode to the positive terminal of the coil and connect the other end of the diode to ground. Be sure to insulate the diode with heat shrink tubing before installation.

 

This repair will not be covered under warranty due to the failure being caused by an aftermarket accessory.

 

– Thanks to Jim Will

Grease on the Torque Converter Housing

On some 2015 Colorado and Canyon models equipped with an automatic transmission (RPO MYB), what appears to be an oil drip may be found on the inspection plug (Fig. 14) on the bottom of the torque converter housing or the crossmember.

 

F14 4051182

Fig 14

 

Remove the inspection plug with a pick tool and inspect the fluid on it. (Fig. 15)

 

F15 4051181

Fig 15

 

The fluid may be grease from the assembly of the transmission to the engine that has migrated to the bottom of the torque converter housing. The fluid will be much thicker than oil.

 

If grease is found, clean out the inspection hole and plug with degreaser and reinstall the plug. Clean any other affected surfaces.

 

– Thanks to Kenneth Cole

Service Know-How

10215.01D – Emerging Issues

January 8, 2014

 

To view Emerging Issues seminars:

• Log in to www.centerlearning.com

–   Select Resources > Service Know-How/TECHAssist > Emerging Issues > Searchable Streaming Video; or

–   Select Catalog to search for the course number, and then select View > Take or Continue Course

 

Service Technical College – New Training Courses

Following are the latest service technical courses available to technicians through the GM Service Technical College.

 

For more information about available service training courses, log in to the GM Center of Learning at www.centerlearning.com and click the Catalog link. Use the drop-down menus to search for courses by delivery type, audience, and category.

 

new training

Bulletin Review – December 2014

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