Archive for October 2015

New Bulletin Numbering System for North America

Perform a Service Bulletin search for a 2015 GM model in the Service Information and you may notice that the bulletin numbers in the search results look a little different. You’ll see a bulletin number such as #15-NA-28 (Fig. 1) as well as more familiar looking numbers such as #15-06-03-001A. Recently, GM changed the bulletin numbering system for all new bulletins going forward in order to commonize the system with other GM regions.

 

F01 new bulletin image

Fig. 1

 

Here’s what the new numbering system means. (Fig. 2)

• The first two places specify the calendar year in which the bulletin was authored. 15 indicates the 2015 calendar year.

• The third and fourth places designate the region where the bulletin was authored. Bulletins that are written in North America have a region code of NA.

• The last three places are the sequencing code. Each region uses their own sequence number.

 

 

 

F02 new bulletin number example 2

Fig. 2

 

If a Service Bulletin is revised for any reason, its number will remain the same. There will no longer be a letter after the bulletin number. Instead, a version number will be added at the bottom of the bulletin along with a statement explaining what was modified.

 

TIP: The new Service Bulletin numbering system only affects 2015 calendar year and later bulletins. Older bulletins will not be updated with the new numbering system.

 

In addition to the bulletin number, the format of the bulletin itself has changed. The models affected by the bulletin are now listed in a table, broken down by Brand, Model, Model Year, VIN, Engine and Transmission. The table format makes it easy to quickly identify the models and components involved.

 

Additional information that may be included in the new bulletins cover the Condition, Production, Correction, Service Procedure, Parts Information, Warranty Information, Version and Bulletin Modification.

 

– Thanks to Ed Laskowski

Share Your Comments on GM Service Information

The goal of the daily-updated GM Service Information is to provide technicians with the information they need to quickly and accurately service GM vehicles. By taking a moment to submit feedback on the Service Information, your comments help ensure the application is user-friendly, working properly, and that the information is correct.

 

The Service Information now includes much more than Service Manuals, Bulletins and Unit Repair Manuals. Depending on the model, other vehicle publications may include Accessories Manuals, Labor Time Guides, Owner Manuals and Supplements, and Pre-Delivery Inspection Forms.

 

Click the Mailbox Icon (Fig. 3)

 

F03 SI mailbox

Fig. 3

 

There are several ways to access the Service Information feedback form.

 

1. On the Service Information home page, click the “Send us your feedback” link next to the mailbox icon under the list of options. (Fig. 4)

 

F04 SI feedback home page

Fig. 4

 

2. Once a vehicle is built, each menu page has a feedback link in the upper right corner of the page. It’s the same mailbox icon. Click the icon to open the feedback form.

 

3. Or on every document in the Service Information, the same feedback link (mailbox icon) can be found in the upper right corner. (Fig. 5)

 

F05 SI feedback service doc

Fig. 5

 

TIP: When in a service document, the feedback form covers Service Information issues. However, when in a Labor Time document, a more comprehensive feedback form is provided to request a labor time review.

 

Feedback Form Details

 

In the feedback form, fill in all of the fields under Dealer Information, To Submit a Problem or To Submit a Suggestion. An asterisk indicates all required fields. (Fig. 6)

F06 SI feedback form

Fig. 6

 

TIP: Be sure to include an email address and phone number. The Service Information team may want to contact you to gather additional information or reply to your feedback with a response.

 

To submit a problem, fill in the requested information. Be as thorough as you can be when giving a detailed description of the problem. Explain exactly what happened and if the problem could be reproduced. Be sure to include the vehicle type and document ID if available.

 

If you have already built a vehicle, and are looking at a service document when you click the feedback button, the feedback form will automatically fill in the vehicle you’re working on and the document ID number.

 

To submit a suggestion, fill in the box provided using your own words to give a detailed description of your suggestion for any improvements you would like to see.

 

Once you have submitted your feedback, a confirmation screen will appear to let you know your submission has been sent.

 

– Thanks to Lisa Scott

 

Supercharger Noise Diagnosis

The supercharger on the 6.2L V8 engine (RPO LT4) of the 2015-2016 Corvette Z06 and 2016 CTS-V produces distinct sounds at different engine RPMs.

 

The sound of the supercharger is different than other various engine noises, such as the high-pressure fuel pump, vacuum pump, valve train or transmission flexplate.

 

Click the LT4 engine (Fig. 7) to listen to the normal sound of the supercharger for reference in determining the origin of an engine noise.

 

2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06

Fig. 7

 

A normal amount of rattle/rumble noise can be heard along with a high-pitched noise that sounds like a generator electrical noise. The rattle/rumble sound also changes with temperature (it’s more noticeable on a warm engine).

 

Supercharger Operation

 

The Roots-type supercharger on the LT4 engine (Fig. 8) is a positive displacement pump that consists of two counter-rotating rotors installed into the lower intake manifold housing. The rotors are designed with four lobes and a helical twist. The rotors of the supercharger are designed to run at a minimal clearance, not in contact with each other or the housing, and are timed to each other by a pair of precision spur gears that are pressed onto the rotor shafts. The rotors are supported at each end by self-lubricating, non-serviceable bearings. The drive belt pulley is pressed onto the input shaft. The input shaft is coupled to the rotor shaft. Both the belt pulley and shaft coupling are non-serviceable.

 

2015 "LT4" 6.2L V-8 AFM VVT DI SC (LT4)

Fig. 8

 

The supercharger is designed to increase the air pressure and density in the intake manifold. When this air is mixed with the correct amount of fuel the result is more power from the engine. This excess air creates a boost pressure in the intake manifold with a maximum engine boost of 66.9 kPa (9.7 psi). Because the supercharger is a positive displacement pump and is directly driven from the engine drive belt system, boost pressure is available at all driving conditions.

 

Supercharger Sounds

 

Here are some typical sounds that are generated by the supercharger.

 

Whine:

• Whine noise is typical of all superchargers and is not a reason to replace the supercharger or other components. • Supercharger whine, inherent to the Roots design, results from eight pulses per engine revolution, 2:1 drive ratio x 4 lobes. The air induction system structure and acoustic resonators are designed to minimize whine.

 

Whistle:

• A whistle noise is generated by tooth contact of the spur gears between the rotors. For instance, a low level whistle may occur at 2,300–2,800 RPM at 80 percent load driving up a very long grade. Although most of these conditions are addressed by sound path isolation to the passenger compartment, some can still be heard by a very critical ear.

 

Supercharger Rattle or Growl:

• Supercharger growl may be heard at low speed or idle, with the engine under light load. • Minuscule crankshaft speed variations, influenced by the torque converter, transmission, drive shaft, differential, and tires, are transmitted through the flexible drive belt to the supercharger. Operating in very thin air, the rotors oscillate and cause the load to alternate from the drive to driven sides of the gear teeth. The entire supercharger drive system is tuned to minimize this noise.

 

Internal Isolator Rattle:

• The supercharger’s internal isolator between the pulley and the rotor shaft is designed to minimize a knocking sound when the engine is turned off and the mass of the supercharger rotor set is suddenly jerked to a stop, and it is tuned to minimize the normal engine firing pulses passed on to the supercharger rotor drive gears. It is active only in an unloaded condition, low engine speed point where boost is not requested. • If the engine or one of the components in the driveline is not operating to design intent, the isolator may make a harsh, intermittent rattle sound that often goes through cycles as the engine speed or other conditions change slightly.

 

– Thanks to Tracy Lucas

What Do You Think? Take the 2015 TechLink Reader Survey

At TechLink, our goal is to provide the latest GM technical news and repair information to help you quickly and accurately repair the vehicles that come into your service department every day.

 

We cover a wide range of topics, from the latest diagnostic and technical repair information to Techline programming, new model features, special tools and more.

 

We would like to hear from technicians and other service department professionals about the types of repair information to cover as well as get your thoughts on how we’re doing. Your input will help in determining the coverage of future editions. So which topics are of interest and value to you?

 

Click the following Survey link or click the Survey link on the right side of the home page to take a short survey about the information you want most in TechLink. The survey will be available until the end of October.

 

Take the Survey

 

Your input is very important to us. Thanks for taking the time to complete the survey. We’ll share the results when the survey is complete.

 

– Thanks to Lisa Scott

Aftermarket Equipment Connected to Multi-Media Ports

Various infotainment conditions caused by aftermarket equipment connected to the multi-media, USB or auxiliary input ports may be found on some 2013-2015 ATS, CTS, SRX, and XTS models equipped with the CUE system; 2014-2015 Regal and LaCrosse models equipped with the IntelliLink system; 2014-2015 Canyon, Sierra, and Yukon models equipped with the IntelliLink system; and 2014-2015 Colorado, Corvette, Impala, Silverado, Suburban, and Tahoe models equipped with the MyLink system.

 

The infotainment conditions may include blank displays, flashing displays, error or update failed messages, the navigation map not loading, or Bluetooth or USB concerns. If any of these conditions are present, check for any devices plugged into the USB ports, SD card slots, or 12 volt accessory ports. (Fig. 9) SD cards mount almost flush to the port and can be difficult to see. Remove the devices prior to diagnosing any infotainment concern.

 

F09 usb ports

Fig. 9

 

Many vehicles also have a USB port that can only be accessed by raising or lowering the radio display/control assembly. Verify there are not any devices in the storage bins behind the display/control assemblies, if applicable

 

– Thanks to Ryan Dorland

Preventing Overhead Entertainment Display Damage

The Warranty Parts Center has received several overhead entertainment displays from 2014-2015 Escalade, SRX; 2015 Silverado, Suburban, Tahoe, Sierra, and Yukon models, equipped with the Rear Seat Entertainment Package (RPO U42), (Fig. 10) with the LVDS (Low Voltage Differential Signaling) cable connector broken off of the display. (Fig. 11)

 

F10 tahoe display

Fig. 10

 

F11 display connector damage

Fig. 11

 

To prevent this damage, do not let the weight of the display hang from the LVDS cable when removing an overhead video display. Instead, support the display and disconnect the LVDS cable to avoid damage to the connector or circuit board.

 

– Thanks to Ryan Dorland

 

Hands-Free Liftgate Operation

The hands-free activation of the power liftgate may be temporarily disabled under some conditions on 2015-2016 Escalade models, Suburban, Tahoe and Yukon models equipped with the Hands-Free Power Liftgate (RPO TC2). (Fig. 12)

 

F12 kick pic

Fig. 12

 

For example, after several hands-free opening and closing events in a row, the power liftgate may be disabled. If the liftgate does not respond to the hands-free kick motion, open and close the liftgate by another method, such as using the power liftgate button on the overhead console or Remote Keyless Entry (RKE) transmitter (key fob), or start the vehicle and the hands-free feature will be re-enabled.

 

Here are a few tips covering the proper operation of the hands-free liftgate feature.

 

Key Fob Range – The RKE key fob must be within the detection area of 3 feet (1 m) of the rear bumper.

 

Kick Zone – Hands-free operation will work best when the foot kick is conducted at the direct center or left of center of the kick zone below the rear bumper. (Fig. 13)

 

F13 kick zone

Fig. 13

 

Foot Kick Motion – The proper foot kick motion is slightly different between short and long wheelbase models.

 

For short wheelbase models (Tahoe, Yukon, and Escalade), kick your foot parallel to the ground in one swift motion underneath the center of the rear bumper, and then pull it back. (Fig. 14)

 

F14 kick short

Fig. 14

 

For long wheelbase models (Suburban, Yukon XL, Escalade ESV), kick your foot straight up in one swift motion under the center of the rear bumper, and then pull it back. (Fig. 15)

 

F15 kick long

Fig. 15

 

On all models, do not sweep your foot from side-to-side, keep your foot under the bumper, or touch the liftgate until it stops moving.

 

The liftgate may open or close if cleaning or working near the rear bumper, splashing water, or stepping into the liftgate opening. To avoid inadvertent operation, keep the RKE key fob away from the rear bumper detection area or turn the power liftgate mode switch to Off.

 

– Thanks to Jim Will

Ambient and HVAC Temperature Display Conditions

On some 2012-2016 Verano, 2013-2015 Malibu, and 2016 Chevrolet Malibu Limited models, the driver and passenger HVAC temperature settings may be displayed in Celsius or the outside ambient temperature may be missing from the radio/HVAC (or infotainment) display. (Fig. 16) These conditions may be caused by the outside ambient temperature sensor being disconnected or the wiring having a fault.

 

F16 temp display

Fig. 16

 

Check the Instrument Panel Cluster for any DTCs. If DTC B0158 (Ambient Air Temperature Sensor Circuit) is set, check that the outside ambient temperature sensor is connected.

 

If the sensor is connected, check the integrity of circuits 61 and 636 from the sensor to the Instrument Panel Cluster. (Fig. 17) If the wiring is secure, follow the diagnostic instructions for DTC B0158 in the appropriate Service Information.

 

F17 circuits

Fig. 17

 

– Thanks to Christopher Crumb

Infotainment System Programming: USB or SPS

Programming the infotainment systems (Fig. 1) on GM vehicles often involves downloading the latest calibrations from TIS2Web through the Service Programming System (SPS). This is referred to as SPS programming for the infotainment components, just as is done on many other modules in a vehicle. In addition, there is also infotainment system programming that requires calibrations downloaded to a USB flash drive. The Service Information instructions, including bulletins and PIs, explain which type of programming is needed. Many times, both types of programming — SPS and USB — are required.

 

Generally, SPS programming updates a module’s firmware, or operating system, while USB programming updates the software of a component.

 

F01 radio

Fig. 1

 

Infotainment Components

 

The Human Machine Interface (HMI), Radio, and Instrument Panel Cluster (IPC) are all modules in a vehicle that may require USB programming at some time. A USB programming event is sometimes followed by a normal SPS programming event.

 

The HMI is responsible for video for the infotainment display, Bluetooth, USB, memory card reader, and speech recognition functions. The HMI module communicates with the infotainment display module via the LIN bus for control information, touch communications and dimming level. Digital video data is sent to the display through a dedicated video cable.

 

The radio is the Media Oriented Systems Transport (MOST) BUS master. The MOST is a high-speed multimedia network. The radio also communicates with other components and systems within the vehicle via GMLAN.

 

USB Programming

 

USB programming is required when a software update is released for a certain issue. The USB programming will update the software to repair the condition. The USB programming is then followed with normal SPS programming to ensure the operating system and software are both the latest versions. This is done so that both are compatible and working together, and that all modules function correctly.

 

When radio programming instructions advise technicians to use Service Programming System (SPS) programming to reprogram the radio, this refers to normal SPS programming.

 

For example, when a radio is replaced, it has the latest software loaded so USB programming is not required for the new radio to function correctly. But if an updated software calibration has been released to address a repair condition, a module, such as the HMI, will need to be reprogrammed using a USB flash drive followed by SPS programming using the latest calibration available on TIS2Web.

 

TIP: USB programming requires a USB 2.0 flash drive. The minimum USB flash drive capacity requirement is 4 GB. Use TIS2Web to download the correct version of the software for the vehicle that is being programmed. Any existing data on the USB flash drive will be erased during the TIS2Web-to-USB flash drive download process. Once the software is downloaded to the USB flash drive, do not add any data to the storage device.

 

Follow the SPS on-screen instructions when performing a USB programming event. After connecting a USB flash drive to the Techline PC, select the appropriate control module and the USB Copy/USB File Transfer option on the SPS Supported Controllers screen.

 

If there is software currently loaded on the USB flash drive, it will be verified and, if the files are incorrect, they will be deleted and the correct files will be loaded. If the files on the USB flash drive are correct for the vehicle being serviced, the Techline PC will not delete those files and will allow the drive to be re-used.

 

Once the USB flash drive is plugged in to the USB port in the vehicle, the infotainment system will recognize that update files are available. Technicians should follow the infotainment display on-screen instructions and select Update when prompted. Use a USB port located in the center console (Fig. 2) or glove box when performing infotainment system and IPC updates. USB ports located on the radio itself should not be used for module programming updates.

 

F02 usb ports

Fig. 2

 

When programming the HMI, it will not allow the installation of the same software version on a USB flash drive. If the same software is detected, the installation process will not start.

 

TIP: HMI damage may a result if the incorrect software is installed using USB programming. Be sure to select Human Machine Interface Control Module – USB Copy/USB File Transfer for each specific VIN be programmed. TIS2Web will check the software currently loaded on the USB flash drive. If the files are incorrect for the vehicle, the files will be deleted and the correct files will be loaded to the USB. When the USB flash drive is loaded with the correct files, a warranty code will be provided.

 

SPS Programming

 

After USB programming, if SPS program also is required, follow the SPS on-screen instructions to download the necessary calibration from TIS2Web for the supported controllers.

 

For many infotainment system repairs, updated software calibrations may be released to address specific issues. In many cases, these repairs do not require USB programming. Update the radio using the SPS system with the latest calibrations available on TIS2Web just as is done for other control modules.

 

When programming some radios, the vehicle modules must go to sleep for five minutes after programming. If not, the vehicle may not have sound, a blank screen may appear, there may not be any touch response, or the wrong screen may appear. If these conditions are present, turn off the vehicle and wait the required five minutes before starting the vehicle again.

 

– Thanks to Mike Magyar

Are You Programming or Reprogramming?

What’s the difference between setting up a control module, programming and reprogramming? Each one is done at different times based on the state of the control module.

 

Here are some definitions that may make it easier to understand the different programming procedures.

Screen Shot 2015-10-09 at 12.54.31 PM

 

– Thanks to Mike Magyar

Apple CarPlay Now Available in Many 2016 GM Models

The 2016 LaCrosse, Regal, ATS, CTS, ELR, Escalade models, Camaro, Colorado Corvette, Impala, Malibu, Silverado, Suburban, Tahoe, Volt, Canyon, Sierra and Yukon models equipped with radio RPOs IO5, IO6, IOA and IOB include the new Apple CarPlay feature. (Fig. 3)

 

2016 GMC Sierra Apple CarPlay

Fig. 3

 

Apple CarPlay capability enables iPhone users to access select smartphone apps through the touchscreen of the MyLink, IntelliLink or Cadillac CUE system or by voice via Siri. Supported apps include Phone, Messages, Maps, Music and third-party audio apps. A full list of supported apps as well as compatible iPhone models can be found at www.apple.com/ios/carplay.

 

Connecting CarPlay

 

If CarPlay is available with a driver’s smartphone, a projection icon will appear on the infotainment home page. No app is required for Apple CarPlay. Simply connect the iPhone by plugging the compatible phone USB cable into a USB data port using the device’s factory-provided USB cable. Be sure to use a factory USB cable; aftermarket cables may not work.

 

TIP: Siri functionality must be turned on in the iPhone settings menu.

 

Once properly connected, the projection icon on the home page will change to the Apple CarPlay icon. Touch the icon to launch CarPlay. If enabled on the infotainment system, Apple CarPlay may launch automatically upon USB connection.

 

The Bluetooth connection to the infotainment system will disconnect when CarPlay is launched. Press and hold the Push to Talk button on the steering wheel or the Phone button below the infotainment screen to activate voice commands for Phone, Messages and other apps.

 

When plugged into a USB port and running CarPlay on the infotainment screen, the iPhone can still be used by a passenger to access other functions of the phone.

 

CarPlay Concerns

 

If there are operating concerns when using Apple CarPlay, run a CarPlay system check by performing the following:

 

1. Confirm that the owner has the latest version of iOS installed on the iPhone.

• On the iPhone, go to Settings – General – About – Version

 

2. Confirm an official Apple Cable is being used.

• Confirm no adaptors are being used.

• Confirm the quality of the cable (i.e no damage such as kinks or pinches to the cable)

 

3. For CarPlay connectivity issues, Siri must be enabled.

• On the iPhone, go to Settings – General – Siri

 

4. For CarPlay connectivity issues, confirm CarPlay is enabled in the Restrictions setting.

• On the iPhone, go to Settings – General – Restrictions.

 

TIP: Currently known device issues and possible corrections can be found in #PI1537. Many issues may be the result of cellular network or carrier concerns or may require an Apple iOS update.

 

Before calling the GM Technical Assistance Center regarding an Apple CarPlay condition, gather the following information:

• Device hardware (iPhone 5C, iPhone 6, etc.)

• iOS version

• Mobile service provider

• WiFi setting on or off, connection, available customer data

• Bluetooth headset connected

 

– Thanks to Hassan Abdallah

 

What Do You Think? Take the 2015 TechLink Reader Survey

At TechLink, our goal is to provide the latest GM technical news and repair information to help you quickly and accurately repair the vehicles that come into your service department every day.

 

We cover a wide range of topics, from the latest diagnostic and technical repair information to Techline programming, new model features, special tools and more.

 

We would like to hear from technicians and other service department professionals about the types of repair information to cover as well as get your thoughts on how we’re doing. Your input will help in determining the coverage of future editions. So which topics are of interest and value to you?

 

Click the following Survey link or click the Survey link on the right side of the home page to take a short survey about the information you want most in TechLink. The survey will be available until the end of October.

 

Take the Survey

 

Your input is very important to us. Thanks for taking the time to complete the survey. We’ll share the results when the survey is complete.

 

– Thanks to Lisa Scott

Adaptive Cruise Control and Lane Keep Assist Inoperative in High Temperatures

On some 2013-2016 ATS, SRX, XTS; 2014-2016 CTS (VIN A); and 2015-2016 Escalade models equipped with Adaptive Cruise Control (RPO KSG) and Lane Keep Assist (RPO UHX), these features may be inoperative after the vehicle has been parked in direct sunlight in high ambient temperatures.

 

An Adaptive Cruise Temporarily Unavailable message may be displayed In the Driver Information Center (DIC) when attempting to use Cruise Control. The Lane Keep Assist feature also will be inoperable on startup and the button indicator will not be illuminated. (Fig. 4) If the Lane Keep Assist switch is pressed, the DIC will display Lane Keep Assist Unavailable.

 

F04 LKA button

Fig. 4

 

These conditions may be the result of the internal ECU temperature exceeding 85° C (185° F) in the Frontview Camera Module (FVCM) used for these features, which causes the image sensor to shut down. The Frontview Camera Module is located forward of the interior rearview mirror.

 

The internal operating temperature range for the image sensor is -40° C to 85° C. (-40° F to 185° F). When the high temperatures occur, the image processor no longer functions and the Adaptive Cruise Control and Lane Keep Assist features will be unavailable until the temperature falls within the operating range.

 

There are two failure modes based on the ECU temperature. The data seen in GDS 2 will be different depending on which failure mode is present.

 

First stage – Adaptive Cruise Temporarily Unavailable message, Lane Keep Assist and camera image sensor do not function

 

GDS Data:

A. Disengage history shows Active Safety Control Module as YES for loss of communication.

 

Second Stage – Adaptive Cruise Temporarily Unavailable message, Lane Keep Assist and camera image sensor do not function, FVCM stops functioning on the bus

 

GDS Data:

A. Disengage history shows Active Safety Control Module as YES for loss of communication.

B. Disengage history shows Front View Camera Module as YES for loss of communication.

C. DTC U026A (Lost Communication with Frontview Camera Module) sets.

 

 

The operation of these systems in high ambient temperatures with the vehicle parked in direct sunlight should be considered normal. When the temperature of the FVCM drops to within the normal operating range during the same drive cycle, the Adaptive Cruise Control and Lane Keep Assist features will return to normal operation.

 

Not parking the vehicle in direct sunlight during high ambient temperatures will lessen the chances of these conditions occurring. In addition, driving the vehicle with the air conditioning on will help in decreasing the cabin/FVCM temperature as quickly as possible.

 

– Thanks to David Antal

UPDATE: Steering Bind after I-Shaft Removal

The steering may bind when turning the steering wheel after having removed the I-Shaft for a service procedure on some 2015-2016 Colorado and Canyon models. The binding may be caused by the I-Shaft nose plug sliding down the inside of the lower I-Shaft and into the joint when the shafts were separated.

 

TIP: The I-Shaft nose plug is used as an assembly aide for vehicle production only to assist in properly aligning and connecting the upper and lower I-Shaft sections.

 

To correct the binding, remove the lower I-Shaft. Next, inspect the upper I-Shaft to determine if the plug is still installed. (Fig. 5) If still installed, remove the plug, discard it and reinstall the lower shaft.

 

F05 4178400

Fig. 5

 

If the plug is not present in the upper I-Shaft, check down the inside of the lower I-Shaft and joint for the plug. Invert the shaft, manipulate the joint and tap the open end on a shop towel on a workbench. If found, remove the plug, discard it and reinstall the lower shaft.

 

Some vehicles may have a foam insert in the lower shaft to help prevent the upper shaft nose plug from falling into the lower shaft joint. Remove the nose plug but leave the foam insert in place.

 

– Thanks to Ken Cole

Engine Timeout after Extended Idle

An engine run timeout feature is standard on all 2015-2016 Tahoe, Suburban, Yukon models and Escalade models equipped with Pushbutton Keyless Start (RPO BTM). (Fig. 6)

 

F06 engine pushbutton

Fig. 6

 

2015 Models without RPO AVF (Built before October 6, 2014)

 

These models will power off after 2.5 hours if the driver leaves the vehicle with the key fob while the engine is running and the shift lever is in Park.

 

After 2.5 hours, if the engine is still running and the key fob is in the vehicle, the vehicle will look for the key fob and, if it locates it in the vehicle, reset the timer an additional 2.5 hours (5 hours total). After 5 hours, the vehicle will turn off.

 

2015 Models with RPO AVF (Built after October 6, 2014) and 2016 Models

 

These models will power off after 1 hour if the driver leaves the vehicle with the key fob while the engine is running and the shift lever is in Park.

 

After 1 hour, if the engine is running and the key fob is in the vehicle, the vehicle will look for the key fob and, if it locates it in the vehicle, reset the timer an additional 1 hour (2 hours total). After 2 hours, the vehicle will turn off.

 

On all models, if the shift lever is moved from Park at any time while the engine is running, the timer will reset and start over.

 

This is normal operation and no repairs should be made.

 

– Thanks to Scott Fibranz

Share Your Thoughts. 2015 Service Advisor Satisfaction Survey Ends October 25

The 2015 Service Advisor Satisfaction Survey is taking place now for U.S. dealerships. All service advisors at GM dealerships are encouraged to voice their opinions. The industry-wide service technician survey will take place in 2016.

 

GM and other automotive manufacturers co-sponsor this annual survey of service technicians and service advisors from across the country. The purpose of the survey is to collect feedback on dealership service trends, satisfaction levels, and dealership operational issues regarding the level of support from GM and the dealership.

 

To access the service advisor survey, go to www.gmserviceadvisorsurvey.com or click the follow link. (Fig. 7)

 

F07 survey image

Fig. 7

 

A random ID is assigned when signing into the survey. Write down the ID. It will allow you to exit and return to your survey, picking up where you left off.

 

To complete the survey, you will need your 6-digit Dealer Code/BAC Code. The survey should take approximately 15 minutes to complete. All survey responses are strictly confidential and you can indicate at the beginning of the survey if you would like your responses to be anonymous.

 

The 2015 survey will be available until October 25, 2015.

 

Your feedback is very important. Please take this opportunity to provide your comments and suggestions about your experiences.

 

– Thanks to George Kalso

Service Know-How

10215.10D – Emerging Issues

October 8, 2015

 

To view Emerging Issues seminars:

• Log in to www.centerlearning.com

–   Select Resources > Service Know-How/TECHAssist > Emerging Issues > Searchable Streaming Video; or

–   Select Catalog to search for the course number, and then select View > Take or Continue Course

Bulletin Review – September 2015

Screen Shot 2015-10-09 at 12.25.45 PMScreen Shot 2015-10-09 at 12.27.28 PMScreen Shot 2015-10-09 at 12.27.37 PM

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